#Repost @diebenkornfoundation with @get_repost ・・・ Can a Richard Diebenkorn painting be explained by science? This is precisely the question computer scientist Russell Kirsch and art historian Joan Kirsch wanted to answer in the 1980s. For their first case study, they attempted to use scientific theory to make an Ocean Park work. “Creating a grammar forces you to think clearly and look clearly,” said Joan L. Kirsch. “Just as one measures things in science, a grammar provides an objective kind of measurement, an objective way of understanding and communicating our knowledge about a work of art.” . The grammar consisted of roughly 42 rules and gave them some success at mimicking the geometric structure of Diebenkorn’s early Ocean Park paintings. His color and application of paint, however, eluded them. The artist, in response to the study, said: “In my work, I’m continually trying to do it differently. For a picture to come to life for me, it necessitates a series of surprises or maybe one big bang of a surprise. That’s the crux of my work. It’s surprise that keeps it alive for me. I’m not sure that the computer allows for that.” . Untitled, 1980, watercolor and acrylic on paper, 34 1/4 x 22 3/8 in. (87 x 56.8 cm) . Quote taken from the article “Computing Art: Can a computer be taught to take a painting’s measure?” by Ivars Peterson. Published by Science News, March 1, 1986. . . . #RichardDiebenkorn #Diebenkorn #DiebenkornDraws #Wednesday #drawing #worksonpaper #OceanPark #geometry #abstraction #art #abstractart #AmericanArtist #sciencenews #RussellKirsch #JoanKirsch #IvarsPeterson #instadaily #instagram​

from Instagram: https://ift.tt/2L7lcjc
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: